archiemcphee:

Have you ever seen a white blue marlin? Now you have, thanks to Bob and Karen Weaver. The couple were fishing off the coast of Los Sueños, Costa Rica aboard the Spanish Fly when they caught and released what both the International Game Fish Association and The Billfish Foundation have identified as a leucistic blue marlin.

Unlike albinism, leucism is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin.

"A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, most leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes."

Both organizations also agree that this is the first time such an awesomely rare creature has been caught on camera. The photos were taken by the crew of the Spanish Fly, a fishing boat chartered through Maverick Yachts and Sportfishing Charters.

[via Twisted Sifter]

I’m trying to summon Edward Cullen

I’m trying to summon Edward Cullen

currentsinbiology:

Octopus supermom sets egg-brooding record
A female deep-sea octopus has broke the record for egg brooding. The mom, a Graneledone boreopacifica, held her eggs in her arms for 4.5 years, until they hatched—and she apparently died. Scientists first spotted her and her eggs in 2007 during one of their regular visits, via a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), to the deep-sea habitat of Monterey Submarine Canyon off the coast of California. She was perched on a rocky outcrop 1397 meters below the ocean’s surface, with her arms curled around her clutch (see video above). Over the next 53 months, the scientists returned to the outcrop 18 times—and each time, there was the female, still patiently guarding her eggs, they report today in PLOS ONE. During their visits, they noticed that she never ate; rather than hunting crabs and shrimp, she pushed them away anytime they got too close to her eggs. She even ignored a tempting bit of crabmeat the scientists extended to her by means of one of the ROV’s arms. They suspect that she may have ingested damaged or unfertilized eggs to stay alive, but the marathon egg brooding took its toll. When the scientists first saw her, she was a pale purple, but over time she turned a ghostly white, her mantle shrank, her skin slackened, and her eyes grew cloudy. The researchers last saw her in September 2011. On their next visit the following month, she was gone; female octopuses invariably die after brooding. Only the tattered remnants of her empty egg capsules remained, indicating a successful hatch.
This female octopus grew frail during the years she spent brooding her eggs.

currentsinbiology:

Octopus supermom sets egg-brooding record

A female deep-sea octopus has broke the record for egg brooding. The mom, a Graneledone boreopacifica, held her eggs in her arms for 4.5 years, until they hatched—and she apparently died. Scientists first spotted her and her eggs in 2007 during one of their regular visits, via a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), to the deep-sea habitat of Monterey Submarine Canyon off the coast of California. She was perched on a rocky outcrop 1397 meters below the ocean’s surface, with her arms curled around her clutch (see video above). Over the next 53 months, the scientists returned to the outcrop 18 times—and each time, there was the female, still patiently guarding her eggs, they report today in PLOS ONE. During their visits, they noticed that she never ate; rather than hunting crabs and shrimp, she pushed them away anytime they got too close to her eggs. She even ignored a tempting bit of crabmeat the scientists extended to her by means of one of the ROV’s arms. They suspect that she may have ingested damaged or unfertilized eggs to stay alive, but the marathon egg brooding took its toll. When the scientists first saw her, she was a pale purple, but over time she turned a ghostly white, her mantle shrank, her skin slackened, and her eyes grew cloudy. The researchers last saw her in September 2011. On their next visit the following month, she was gone; female octopuses invariably die after brooding. Only the tattered remnants of her empty egg capsules remained, indicating a successful hatch.

This female octopus grew frail during the years she spent brooding her eggs.

Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion cubicus)
As its name suggests, the yellow boxfish is roughly shaped like a box. It’s juvenile colouration of bright yellow and black dots serves as a warning for it’s toxicity. If stressed, the boxfish can secrete poisons from its skin which can kill other fish in surrounding waters.
Klaus Stiefel via Flickr

Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion cubicus)

As its name suggests, the yellow boxfish is roughly shaped like a box. It’s juvenile colouration of bright yellow and black dots serves as a warning for it’s toxicity. If stressed, the boxfish can secrete poisons from its skin which can kill other fish in surrounding waters.

Klaus Stiefel via Flickr

Lionfish
Nazir Amin on Flickr

Lionfish

Nazir Amin on Flickr

underthevastblueseas:

Glass eels typically refers to an intermediary stage in the eel’s complex life. The term typically refers to a transparent glass eel of the family Anguillidae. These are the freshwater eels that spawn in the ocean, and then enter estuaries as glass eels and swim upstream to live in freshwater during their juvenile growth phase. As the glass eels enter freshwater they start to become pigmented and are typically referred to as elvers. The elvers grow larger and are referred to as yellow eels, which are the juvenile stage of eels before their reproductive maturation begins.

source

how nice would they be battered and deep fried

libutron:

Spotted unicornfish  (Short-nosed unicornfish)
Yes, unicornfish exist! and there are about 20 species of them, belonging to the genus Naso, in the Acanthuridae Family.
This one, for example, is Naso brevirostris (Perciformes - Acanthuridae), distinctive by its long, broad-based tapering horn before eye (a bump on forehead of juveniles). This species is olive-brown to grey; has many small dark spots on the head and lower body, and many thin dark bars on the upper body; the tail is whitish with dark blotch at base.
Naso brevirostris is widespread and cosmopolitan, occupying a wide range of habitats. It is found in the Pacific and Indian oceans.
Other common names: Palefin Unicornfish, Shortsnout Unicornfish, Brown Unicornfish, Shortnosed Kala, Shortnose Unicornfish, Longnose Unicornfish, Corne, Nasique, Nason à Rostre Court, Nason Pointillé.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Sue Merrifield
Locality: Maldives

libutron:

Spotted unicornfish  (Short-nosed unicornfish)

Yes, unicornfish exist! and there are about 20 species of them, belonging to the genus Naso, in the Acanthuridae Family.

This one, for example, is Naso brevirostris (Perciformes - Acanthuridae), distinctive by its long, broad-based tapering horn before eye (a bump on forehead of juveniles). This species is olive-brown to grey; has many small dark spots on the head and lower body, and many thin dark bars on the upper body; the tail is whitish with dark blotch at base.

Naso brevirostris is widespread and cosmopolitan, occupying a wide range of habitats. It is found in the Pacific and Indian oceans.

Other common names: Palefin Unicornfish, Shortsnout Unicornfish, Brown Unicornfish, Shortnosed Kala, Shortnose Unicornfish, Longnose Unicornfish, Corne, Nasique, Nason à Rostre Court, Nason Pointillé.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Sue Merrifield

Locality: Maldives