Why Justin Bieber Shouldn’t Have a Monkey
On his recent travels in Europe, Justin Bieber ran into some problems in Germany. He had not obtained proper papers to bring his pet capuchin monkey into the country, so the monkey was put into quarantine.
That made us wonder: Do capuchin monkeys make good pets? We asked Debbie Leahy, manager of captive wildlife protection for the Humane Society of the United States.
Read Article: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
(via Why Justin Bieber Shouldn’t Have a Monkey)

Why Justin Bieber Shouldn’t Have a Monkey

On his recent travels in Europe, Justin Bieber ran into some problems in Germany. He had not obtained proper papers to bring his pet capuchin monkey into the country, so the monkey was put into quarantine.

That made us wonder: Do capuchin monkeys make good pets? We asked Debbie Leahy, manager of captive wildlife protection for the Humane Society of the United States.

Read Article: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

(via Why Justin Bieber Shouldn’t Have a Monkey)

Frogfish - Amazing Speed-Gulp Killing

In a mere 1/100th of a second, the Frogfish is able to swallow unsuspecting prey. A frogfish’s mouth cavity can expand to 12 times its size, allowing it to ingest prey that are 25 percent longer than itself.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Seagulls Remove Parasites on Sunfish - National Geographic

Being the largest bony fish in the world brings with it problems of the parasitic kind. Unable to remove the parasites itself, the sunfish (Mola mola) seeks the help of smaller fish to remove them directly from the skin. However, some parasites call for the help of a more specialist species - seagulls.

© NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

National Geographic - Promiscuous Dolphins

The fabled stories of casual dolphin sex, dolphin pedophilia, gay dolphins, dolphin rape … in HD with narration.

This is my type of bird ;)

This is my type of bird ;)

Piranha
National Geographic - Notorious for their sharp teeth and voracious appetites, piranhas inhabit several of the major river basins in South America. These omnivorous fish are known for their taste for meat, although attacks on human beings are quite rare, despite breathless accounts from early explorers.
In a historic visit to Brazil, Theodore Roosevelt famously saw a group of piranhas shredding pieces of a cow carcass in seconds. His dramatic account would color popular imagination for years, even though it was based on a manipulated spectacle in which fishermen blocked off a group of the fish and starved them beforehand.
Still, piranhas are important scavengers and predators in their native rivers, and they often resort to cannibalism if food gets scarce. It’s true that local fishermen occasionally have scars from close encounters with them.
It’s unknown how many species of piranhas exist, with estimates ranging from 30 to 60. —Brian Clark Howard
The 13 Scariest Freshwater Animals - National Geographic
Photograph by Martin Shields, Alamy

Piranha

National Geographic - Notorious for their sharp teeth and voracious appetites, piranhas inhabit several of the major river basins in South America. These omnivorous fish are known for their taste for meat, although attacks on human beings are quite rare, despite breathless accounts from early explorers.

In a historic visit to Brazil, Theodore Roosevelt famously saw a group of piranhas shredding pieces of a cow carcass in seconds. His dramatic account would color popular imagination for years, even though it was based on a manipulated spectacle in which fishermen blocked off a group of the fish and starved them beforehand.

Still, piranhas are important scavengers and predators in their native rivers, and they often resort to cannibalism if food gets scarce. It’s true that local fishermen occasionally have scars from close encounters with them.

It’s unknown how many species of piranhas exist, with estimates ranging from 30 to 60. —Brian Clark Howard

The 13 Scariest Freshwater Animals - National Geographic

Photograph by Martin Shields, Alamy

Toadfish (Batrachoididae)
National Geographic - The toadfish croaks like its amphibian namesake but typically looks more like the seafloor surroundings where it lies in wait for prey. The fish also has a remarkable tolerance for ammonia, 10 to 20 times greater than that of a human. Scientists studying how the toadfish survives such toxins say the humble animal could someday help produce medical treatments for human ailments including liver disease, stroke, heart attack, and brain injury.
Photograph by Kristian Taylor, My Shot
View more Masters of Undersea Camouflage at National Geographic

Toadfish (Batrachoididae)

National Geographic - The toadfish croaks like its amphibian namesake but typically looks more like the seafloor surroundings where it lies in wait for prey. The fish also has a remarkable tolerance for ammonia, 10 to 20 times greater than that of a human. Scientists studying how the toadfish survives such toxins say the humble animal could someday help produce medical treatments for human ailments including liver disease, stroke, heart attack, and brain injury.

Photograph by Kristian Taylor, My Shot

View more Masters of Undersea Camouflage at National Geographic