smartpeopleposting:

Dams make spawning salmon more prone to heart attack: UBC study

Reaching spawning grounds is hard work for salmon, and UBC researchers say fish forced to “sprint” through fast-moving water or other obstacles can suffer heart attacks.
The study found sockeye are more likely to die in the hours after being forced to swim fast and hard to make their way through turbulent waters below dams.
Researchers say so-called “burst swimming” creates severe stress that could lead to heart failure.
Female sockeye are especially prone, in part because females may be using more energy to produce eggs, hiking their sensitivity to other environmental challenges.
Biologist and lead author Nicholas Burnett says the study demonstrates how vital it is for salmon to have easy access around obstacles in the river.
The study is published in the latest issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.

smartpeopleposting:

Dams make spawning salmon more prone to heart attack: UBC study

Reaching spawning grounds is hard work for salmon, and UBC researchers say fish forced to “sprint” through fast-moving water or other obstacles can suffer heart attacks.

The study found sockeye are more likely to die in the hours after being forced to swim fast and hard to make their way through turbulent waters below dams.

Researchers say so-called “burst swimming” creates severe stress that could lead to heart failure.

Female sockeye are especially prone, in part because females may be using more energy to produce eggs, hiking their sensitivity to other environmental challenges.

Biologist and lead author Nicholas Burnett says the study demonstrates how vital it is for salmon to have easy access around obstacles in the river.

The study is published in the latest issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Mountain Redbelly Dace (Chrosomus oreas)
…a species of Dace (Leuciscinae) which is native to North America, where it occurs in Mountain and Piedmont regions of the Atlantic Slope from the Shenandoah River to Neuse River drainages and upper New River drainages. Mountain redbelly daces typically inhabit rocky pools and runs of headwaters, creeks, and small/medium rivers where they will feed on a variety of small invertebrates, algae, and diatoms.
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cypriniformes-Cyprinidae-Leuciscinae-Chrosomus-C. oreas
Image: Seelig, C

astronomy-to-zoology:

Mountain Redbelly Dace (Chrosomus oreas)

…a species of Dace (Leuciscinae) which is native to North America, where it occurs in Mountain and Piedmont regions of the Atlantic Slope from the Shenandoah River to Neuse River drainages and upper New River drainages. Mountain redbelly daces typically inhabit rocky pools and runs of headwaters, creeks, and small/medium rivers where they will feed on a variety of small invertebrates, algae, and diatoms.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cypriniformes-Cyprinidae-Leuciscinae-Chrosomus-C. oreas

Image: Seelig, C

Look how pretty they are

Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)
The northern snakehead is a freshwater fish native to east Asia. It is a very tough fish as its modified gill arches allow it to breathe atmospheric air. It has been known to be able to survive for 4 days out of water and can migrate on dry land for up to 1/4 mile. The fish has become an serious invasive species in many parts of the world because of its hardiness and top-level predation abilities.
Brian Gratwicke via Flickr

Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)

The northern snakehead is a freshwater fish native to east Asia. It is a very tough fish as its modified gill arches allow it to breathe atmospheric air. It has been known to be able to survive for 4 days out of water and can migrate on dry land for up to 1/4 mile. The fish has become an serious invasive species in many parts of the world because of its hardiness and top-level predation abilities.

Brian Gratwicke via Flickr

Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)
The oscar fish is a species of cichlid native to South America. It is a popular fish in the aquarium trade, growing up to 45 cm and often perceived as intelligent. Several ornamental strains have been developed, including albino and long finned varieties. 
Elma on Flickr

Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)

The oscar fish is a species of cichlid native to South America. It is a popular fish in the aquarium trade, growing up to 45 cm and often perceived as intelligent. Several ornamental strains have been developed, including albino and long finned varieties. 

Elma on Flickr

Electric Eel (Electrophorus electricus)
The electric eel is a freshwater fish that is known to produce electrical shocks to stun prey and predators. This species grows up to 2 m in length and has become an apex predator in its South American range.
To generate electricity, the fish has specialised organs along the length of its body. These organs are made up of cells called “electrocytes”, which are able to produce charges of 0.15 V each. The electric eel has 5000-6000 of these cells lined up much like batteries in series to produce a cumulative shock of up to 600 V.
Despite the high voltage, the shock is unlikely to kill an adult human due to its extremely short duration of less than 2 milliseconds.
Brian Gratwicke on Flickr

Electric Eel (Electrophorus electricus)

The electric eel is a freshwater fish that is known to produce electrical shocks to stun prey and predators. This species grows up to 2 m in length and has become an apex predator in its South American range.

To generate electricity, the fish has specialised organs along the length of its body. These organs are made up of cells called “electrocytes”, which are able to produce charges of 0.15 V each. The electric eel has 5000-6000 of these cells lined up much like batteries in series to produce a cumulative shock of up to 600 V.

Despite the high voltage, the shock is unlikely to kill an adult human due to its extremely short duration of less than 2 milliseconds.

Brian Gratwicke on Flickr

rhamphotheca:

American Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  It’s wildlife Wednesday and we are going to talk paddlefish. It is among the oldest surviving fish species in North America. But this ancient fish species has been greatly reduced or extirpated over much of its range. 
Paddlefish can live up to 30 years and grow up to 7 feet long and weigh 200 pounds. The fish’s long, paddle-shaped snout accounts for about one-third of its total body length. The snout helps to stabilize the fish as it swims. 
Close to 50 paddlefish were recently released into Caddo Lake on the Texas-Louisiana border and the river that forms it, Big Cypress Bayou. The paddlefish were raised at the  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Fisheries's Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery in Oklahoma. They are 18 months old, 2-3 feet in length, and have a surgically-implanted radio transmitter that will allow scientists to track the movement of individual fish…
(read more: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

rhamphotheca:

American Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  It’s wildlife Wednesday and we are going to talk paddlefish. It is among the oldest surviving fish species in North America. But this ancient fish species has been greatly reduced or extirpated over much of its range. 

Paddlefish can live up to 30 years and grow up to 7 feet long and weigh 200 pounds. The fish’s long, paddle-shaped snout accounts for about one-third of its total body length. The snout helps to stabilize the fish as it swims. 

Close to 50 paddlefish were recently released into Caddo Lake on the Texas-Louisiana border and the river that forms it, Big Cypress Bayou. The paddlefish were raised at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Fisheries's Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery in Oklahoma. They are 18 months old, 2-3 feet in length, and have a surgically-implanted radio transmitter that will allow scientists to track the movement of individual fish…

(read more: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)