rhamphotheca:

Rare Fish Species Found in Australian Outback Bore Drain

by Chrissy Arthur

A thriving population of a small endangered fish has been discovered on a drought-affected outback Queensland cattle station.The Edgbaston goby (Chlamydogobius squamigenus) was only known to live in natural artesian springs on Edgbaston Reserve near Aramac, north-east of Longreach.

But fish have now been discovered in a man-made artesian bore drain 40 km away at the Ravenswood Station at Aramac. Freshwater ecologist Dr Adam Kerezsy stumbled across the rarity when surveying local waters.The fish do not swim very well, so Dr Kerezsy believed they arrived in a flood…

(read more: ABC News - Australia)

photos: Dr. Adam Kerezsy

preppybiologist:

rhamphotheca:

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction
by Elizabeth Palermo
Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.
A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…
(read more: Live Science)
photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

I met one of the few arapaima researchers last year (Dr. Don Stewart from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry). He’s a cool guy: he loves these fish and he hates the declines that he’s witnessed. He just wants people to understand why they’re important and why conservation matters. Plus, he does some awesome citizen science by getting the natives involved!

preppybiologist:

rhamphotheca:

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction

by Elizabeth Palermo

Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.

A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…

(read more: Live Science)

photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

I met one of the few arapaima researchers last year (Dr. Don Stewart from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry). He’s a cool guy: he loves these fish and he hates the declines that he’s witnessed. He just wants people to understand why they’re important and why conservation matters. Plus, he does some awesome citizen science by getting the natives involved!

smartpeopleposting:

Dams make spawning salmon more prone to heart attack: UBC study

Reaching spawning grounds is hard work for salmon, and UBC researchers say fish forced to “sprint” through fast-moving water or other obstacles can suffer heart attacks.
The study found sockeye are more likely to die in the hours after being forced to swim fast and hard to make their way through turbulent waters below dams.
Researchers say so-called “burst swimming” creates severe stress that could lead to heart failure.
Female sockeye are especially prone, in part because females may be using more energy to produce eggs, hiking their sensitivity to other environmental challenges.
Biologist and lead author Nicholas Burnett says the study demonstrates how vital it is for salmon to have easy access around obstacles in the river.
The study is published in the latest issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.

smartpeopleposting:

Dams make spawning salmon more prone to heart attack: UBC study

Reaching spawning grounds is hard work for salmon, and UBC researchers say fish forced to “sprint” through fast-moving water or other obstacles can suffer heart attacks.

The study found sockeye are more likely to die in the hours after being forced to swim fast and hard to make their way through turbulent waters below dams.

Researchers say so-called “burst swimming” creates severe stress that could lead to heart failure.

Female sockeye are especially prone, in part because females may be using more energy to produce eggs, hiking their sensitivity to other environmental challenges.

Biologist and lead author Nicholas Burnett says the study demonstrates how vital it is for salmon to have easy access around obstacles in the river.

The study is published in the latest issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Mountain Redbelly Dace (Chrosomus oreas)
…a species of Dace (Leuciscinae) which is native to North America, where it occurs in Mountain and Piedmont regions of the Atlantic Slope from the Shenandoah River to Neuse River drainages and upper New River drainages. Mountain redbelly daces typically inhabit rocky pools and runs of headwaters, creeks, and small/medium rivers where they will feed on a variety of small invertebrates, algae, and diatoms.
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cypriniformes-Cyprinidae-Leuciscinae-Chrosomus-C. oreas
Image: Seelig, C

astronomy-to-zoology:

Mountain Redbelly Dace (Chrosomus oreas)

…a species of Dace (Leuciscinae) which is native to North America, where it occurs in Mountain and Piedmont regions of the Atlantic Slope from the Shenandoah River to Neuse River drainages and upper New River drainages. Mountain redbelly daces typically inhabit rocky pools and runs of headwaters, creeks, and small/medium rivers where they will feed on a variety of small invertebrates, algae, and diatoms.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cypriniformes-Cyprinidae-Leuciscinae-Chrosomus-C. oreas

Image: Seelig, C

Look how pretty they are

Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)
The northern snakehead is a freshwater fish native to east Asia. It is a very tough fish as its modified gill arches allow it to breathe atmospheric air. It has been known to be able to survive for 4 days out of water and can migrate on dry land for up to 1/4 mile. The fish has become an serious invasive species in many parts of the world because of its hardiness and top-level predation abilities.
Brian Gratwicke via Flickr

Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)

The northern snakehead is a freshwater fish native to east Asia. It is a very tough fish as its modified gill arches allow it to breathe atmospheric air. It has been known to be able to survive for 4 days out of water and can migrate on dry land for up to 1/4 mile. The fish has become an serious invasive species in many parts of the world because of its hardiness and top-level predation abilities.

Brian Gratwicke via Flickr

Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)
The oscar fish is a species of cichlid native to South America. It is a popular fish in the aquarium trade, growing up to 45 cm and often perceived as intelligent. Several ornamental strains have been developed, including albino and long finned varieties. 
Elma on Flickr

Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)

The oscar fish is a species of cichlid native to South America. It is a popular fish in the aquarium trade, growing up to 45 cm and often perceived as intelligent. Several ornamental strains have been developed, including albino and long finned varieties. 

Elma on Flickr