Bichir
Bichirs are a primitive group of fish that are considered by some to be the evolutionary link between amphibians and fish. Their jaw structure more closely resembles that of the tetrapods compared to ray-finned fishes. Additionally, they possess a pair of lungs which allow them to breathe atmospheric air.
(Polypterus senegalus depicted)
Elma via Wikimedia Commons

Bichir

Bichirs are a primitive group of fish that are considered by some to be the evolutionary link between amphibians and fish. Their jaw structure more closely resembles that of the tetrapods compared to ray-finned fishes. Additionally, they possess a pair of lungs which allow them to breathe atmospheric air.

(Polypterus senegalus depicted)

Elma via Wikimedia Commons

facts-i-just-made-up:

darrynek:

These pics were taken one second apart
Lightning is REALLY BRIGHT

That’s the thing though, this isn’t lightning. The photos were both taken in daytime, the right photo being the normal condition. What you’re seeing in the left photo is a darkning strike.
Darkning is 50,000 times more rare than lightning, in fact most storms will never have a single instance of it. But when static charges between clouds become so energized that the electricity begins to form its own gravity, a black hole like the one created at CERN is briefly formed, sucking up all the light in the area and resulting in a brief “unflash” of darkning.
Less dangerous than lightning, Darkning lasts for a shorter time and you’d have to be within the event horizon to be harmed by it. Despite thousands a year dying of lightning strikes, only one man has ever been recorded as killed in a darkning strike, and that man was Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland, which many historians believe he wrote based on that strange and fatal experience.

facts-i-just-made-up:

darrynek:

These pics were taken one second apart

Lightning is REALLY BRIGHT

That’s the thing though, this isn’t lightning. The photos were both taken in daytime, the right photo being the normal condition. What you’re seeing in the left photo is a darkning strike.

Darkning is 50,000 times more rare than lightning, in fact most storms will never have a single instance of it. But when static charges between clouds become so energized that the electricity begins to form its own gravity, a black hole like the one created at CERN is briefly formed, sucking up all the light in the area and resulting in a brief “unflash” of darkning.

Less dangerous than lightning, Darkning lasts for a shorter time and you’d have to be within the event horizon to be harmed by it. Despite thousands a year dying of lightning strikes, only one man has ever been recorded as killed in a darkning strike, and that man was Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland, which many historians believe he wrote based on that strange and fatal experience.

Peters’ Elephantnose Fish (Gnathonemus petersii)

The elephantnose fish is a freshwater fish native to the rivers of West and Central Africa. Their trunk-like protrusion is an extension of the mouth that is covered with sensitive electroreceptors. The fish is able to use these receptors, along with a weak electrical field that it generates through muscular contractions, to find hidden prey and navigate in low visibility conditions.

© Sullivan, John P, Bjoertvedt

Poison Dart Frog with Tadpoles
Many species of poison dart frog are dedicated parents. The eggs are usually laid on the forest floor amongst leaf litter. Once the eggs hatch, the parents transport the tadpoles away from the dangerous ground to a safer environment such as a water filled bromeliad or tree hole. The tadpoles cling onto mucus on the parent’s back. The female will visit her young every few days and deposits unfertilised eggs for her tadpoles to eat.
Lee on Flickr

Poison Dart Frog with Tadpoles

Many species of poison dart frog are dedicated parents. The eggs are usually laid on the forest floor amongst leaf litter. Once the eggs hatch, the parents transport the tadpoles away from the dangerous ground to a safer environment such as a water filled bromeliad or tree hole. The tadpoles cling onto mucus on the parent’s back. The female will visit her young every few days and deposits unfertilised eggs for her tadpoles to eat.

Lee on Flickr

Poison Dart Frog

Poison dart frogs consist of the family Dendrobatidae and are native to the rainforests of South and Central America. They are known for their bright colours and toxic secretions, which have been used by indigenous cultures to create poisonous darts for hunting.

The conspicuous colorations and patterns of the frogs warns potential predators of their toxicity. It is hypothesised that the frogs gain their poisons from their diet, which can consist of ants, centipedes and mites. In captivity, frogs which are reared on diets without these alkaloid poisons have a significantly lower level of toxins.

Around 4 species are used by indigenous peoples to lace darts with deadly toxins. The frogs are carefully exposed to fire, which causes them to exude a poisonous fluid. The tips of arrows and darts are soaked in this fluid and will remain deadly for 2 years.

Geoff Gallice, Drriss & Marrionn on Flickr

Bicolour Parrotfish (Cetoscarus bicolor)
Parrotfish are a family of wrasses that can be found in coral reefs, rocky coasts and seagrass beds. They play a significant role in a process known as bioerosion.
Bioerosion refers to to the breaking down of hard marine substrates by organisms. The parrotfish is known to ingest coral, eating the edible polyps while crushing and excreting the inedible portions as sand. Their teeth grow continuously to replace material worn down by this feeding. Additionally, they have teeth located in their throat which can grind up coral chunks into sand.
One parrotfish can produce up to 90 kg of sand a year. They play an essential role in their ecosystem by preventing overgrowth of coral and creating and distributing coral sands.
Richard Ling on Flickr

Bicolour Parrotfish (Cetoscarus bicolor)

Parrotfish are a family of wrasses that can be found in coral reefs, rocky coasts and seagrass beds. They play a significant role in a process known as bioerosion.

Bioerosion refers to to the breaking down of hard marine substrates by organisms. The parrotfish is known to ingest coral, eating the edible polyps while crushing and excreting the inedible portions as sand. Their teeth grow continuously to replace material worn down by this feeding. Additionally, they have teeth located in their throat which can grind up coral chunks into sand.

One parrotfish can produce up to 90 kg of sand a year. They play an essential role in their ecosystem by preventing overgrowth of coral and creating and distributing coral sands.

Richard Ling on Flickr

Genetically Modified Corn Responds to ‘Pain’
Scientists in Australia have been successful in creating the world’s first case of plant perception in a recently created artificial strain of corn.
The corn, known as “XB59” has had DNA from mice incorporated into its own genetic makeup and was originally manufactured to become a new strain of superior, faster growing food crop.
The geneticists Ryan Jamison and Rhonda Carl recently published their paper, “Sensory perceptions in the GM corn XB59”, in Biotech of Tomorrow, a leading international peer reviewed journal. In it, they detail experiments done to show that the crops are able to associate ‘painful’ activities such as cutting or burning with death.
According to Jamison, “when [the plants] are exposed to harmful stimuli, they exhibit signs of withdrawal such as wilting or localised death”.
XB59 has been hailed within the GMO industry as a modern food crop, which is able to produce profitable produce twice as fast as traditional corn. 
Despite its agricultural success, some groups have expressed apprehension towards what they perceive as “plant sentience”. Edna Krause, spokesperson for AIFN said in an interview with the Omicron that “the GMO industry must tread carefully when it comes to modifying crops. … This has the potential to create a whole new field of ethical violations.”
Read the full article

 April fools

Genetically Modified Corn Responds to ‘Pain’

Scientists in Australia have been successful in creating the world’s first case of plant perception in a recently created artificial strain of corn.

The corn, known as “XB59” has had DNA from mice incorporated into its own genetic makeup and was originally manufactured to become a new strain of superior, faster growing food crop.

The geneticists Ryan Jamison and Rhonda Carl recently published their paper, “Sensory perceptions in the GM corn XB59”, in Biotech of Tomorrow, a leading international peer reviewed journal. In it, they detail experiments done to show that the crops are able to associate ‘painful’ activities such as cutting or burning with death.

According to Jamison, “when [the plants] are exposed to harmful stimuli, they exhibit signs of withdrawal such as wilting or localised death”.

XB59 has been hailed within the GMO industry as a modern food crop, which is able to produce profitable produce twice as fast as traditional corn. 

Despite its agricultural success, some groups have expressed apprehension towards what they perceive as “plant sentience”. Edna Krause, spokesperson for AIFN said in an interview with the Omicron that “the GMO industry must tread carefully when it comes to modifying crops. … This has the potential to create a whole new field of ethical violations.”

Read the full article

April fools